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Appointeeship and Deputyship FAQs

Welfare benefits, carer cards and money
management for vulnerable people FAQ’s

Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A DWP appointee is someone who is appointed to manage the welfare benefits and money management matters of a person who is unable to do so themselves.

This could be because the person has a mental or physical disability, or they are unable to manage their affairs for other reasons.

The appointee is responsible for making sure that the person’s welfare benefits are applied for accurately, received in a separate bank account and used for the benefit of the person they are appointed to represent.

They are also responsible for managing the person’s finances, paying bills and making decisions about how the person’s money is spent.

To become a DWP appointee, a person must apply to the Department for Work and Pensions by completing a BF56 application form and then meet with a DWP visiting officer.

Once appointed, the appointee has legal responsibilities and must act in the best interests of the person they represent and understand the 5 underpinning principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A corporate appointee is an organisation appointed by the DWP to manage the welfare benefit responsibilities of a claimant. For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Form BF56 must be completed and submitted to the relevant DWP department to become an appointee. An appointment with a DWP Visiting Officer must be made so that the DWP can assess the suitability of a person or organisation that is applying to take on the legal role.

Background checks against the individual or organisation may be made also with consent.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee has to be aged 18 plus and can be a family member or trusted friend or a specialist organisation whom the DWP can authorise to become the person’s corporate appointee.

The local council can also act as the appointee, although there can be conflicts of interest when local authorities become appointees. As such, many local authorities are choosing to partner with organisations such as Money Carer. Many local authorities do not have enough resources to provide an appointeeship service, which is another reason they cannot take on the role.

Some care providers also still act as appointees however, again, due to the conflicts of interest, these arrangements are increasingly being discouraged by local authorities and the care services regulator as not reflecting best practice.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

The minimum age to act as an appointee is 18 years old.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

If the DWP are satisfied that the family member is suitable to undertake the duties of an appointee they can be appointed to undertake the legal responsibilities. Family members should actually be the first people approached to take on the role where possible as they are most likely to know the person requiring an appointee best.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

The appointee can be nominated for a temporary period, for example following an accident or a short-term illness. In fact, many appointeeships are temporary in so much as the service user may simply need assistance for an interim period.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

A GP can make a referral to social services and ask that an assessment is made to determine if the client requires an appointee.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee will need to be provided with the online login details for the claimant’s universal credit journal or, online account, with the DWP.

The appointee is then responsible for keeping the DWP up to date with the claimant’s financial situation and communicating any changes in their circumstances.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

 

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

DWP Visiting Officers work for the Department for Work and Pensions.

They are responsible for conducting home visits to verify a claimant’s eligibility for certain benefits, such as disability benefits or attendance allowance and also to verify the suitability of a prospective appointee as someone who wishes to act on behalf of the claimant.

During the visit, the DWP Visiting Officer may ask questions about the claimant’s health condition or disability, review any medical evidence or documentation provided by the claimant, and may observe the claimant carrying out specific tasks to determine their level of functional ability and also ask the prospective appointee about their relationship with the claimant amongst other questions to assess their perceived suitability.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

 

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Power of Attorney - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

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Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A DWP appointee is someone who is appointed to manage the welfare benefits and money management matters of a person who is unable to do so themselves.

This could be because the person has a mental or physical disability, or they are unable to manage their affairs for other reasons.

The appointee is responsible for making sure that the person’s welfare benefits are applied for accurately, received in a separate bank account and used for the benefit of the person they are appointed to represent.

They are also responsible for managing the person’s finances, paying bills and making decisions about how the person’s money is spent.

To become a DWP appointee, a person must apply to the Department for Work and Pensions by completing a BF56 application form and then meet with a DWP visiting officer.

Once appointed, the appointee has legal responsibilities and must act in the best interests of the person they represent and understand the 5 underpinning principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A corporate appointee is an organisation appointed by the DWP to manage the welfare benefit responsibilities of a claimant. For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Form BF56 must be completed and submitted to the relevant DWP department to become an appointee. An appointment with a DWP Visiting Officer must be made so that the DWP can assess the suitability of a person or organisation that is applying to take on the legal role.

Background checks against the individual or organisation may be made also with consent.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee has to be aged 18 plus and can be a family member or trusted friend or a specialist organisation whom the DWP can authorise to become the person’s corporate appointee.

The local council can also act as the appointee, although there can be conflicts of interest when local authorities become appointees. As such, many local authorities are choosing to partner with organisations such as Money Carer. Many local authorities do not have enough resources to provide an appointeeship service, which is another reason they cannot take on the role.

Some care providers also still act as appointees however, again, due to the conflicts of interest, these arrangements are increasingly being discouraged by local authorities and the care services regulator as not reflecting best practice.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

The minimum age to act as an appointee is 18 years old.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

If the DWP are satisfied that the family member is suitable to undertake the duties of an appointee they can be appointed to undertake the legal responsibilities. Family members should actually be the first people approached to take on the role where possible as they are most likely to know the person requiring an appointee best.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

The appointee can be nominated for a temporary period, for example following an accident or a short-term illness. In fact, many appointeeships are temporary in so much as the service user may simply need assistance for an interim period.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

A GP can make a referral to social services and ask that an assessment is made to determine if the client requires an appointee.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee will need to be provided with the online login details for the claimant’s universal credit journal or, online account, with the DWP.

The appointee is then responsible for keeping the DWP up to date with the claimant’s financial situation and communicating any changes in their circumstances.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

 

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

DWP Visiting Officers work for the Department for Work and Pensions.

They are responsible for conducting home visits to verify a claimant’s eligibility for certain benefits, such as disability benefits or attendance allowance and also to verify the suitability of a prospective appointee as someone who wishes to act on behalf of the claimant.

During the visit, the DWP Visiting Officer may ask questions about the claimant’s health condition or disability, review any medical evidence or documentation provided by the claimant, and may observe the claimant carrying out specific tasks to determine their level of functional ability and also ask the prospective appointee about their relationship with the claimant amongst other questions to assess their perceived suitability.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

 

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Power of Attorney - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

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