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Appointeeship and Deputyship FAQs

Welfare benefits, carer cards and money
management for vulnerable people FAQ’s

Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A corporate appointee is an organisation appointed by the DWP to manage the welfare benefit responsibilities of a claimant. For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

No, DWP appointees do not have the legal authority to access a person’s private bank account unless they have been specifically granted that authority by the person or by a court order.

Where the person has consented for their appointee to access their personal bank account, then it must be clear, that the person has the ‘decision specific’ capacity to be able to weigh up and understand this decision.

It may be appropriate to have this decision-specific understanding documented in a separate mental capacity assessment as best practice to avoid any challenges about the persons ability to consent to someone accessing their personal bank account by banks or other organisations.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Uniquely, we have our own banking platform with Cashplus Bank and this service is used by hundreds of law firms and local authorities to manage the finances of their own clients.

We are also able to open bank accounts for family members who are appointees, deputies, or have a lasting power of attorney.

The dedicated site for our banking platform is here.

 

View this video on our YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes, but possibly with some difficulty.

The reality is that it can be quite difficult for a DWP appointee to open a bank account with a high-street bank.

This is because an appointee does not have the same level of authority that a court of protection deputy or lasting power of attorney has. Although some banks do offer a very basic bank account for DWP appointees the process of opening an account can be long-winded and quite involved.

Some bank accounts that are available to appointees also have restrictions such as balance limitations as low as £3000 in some cases. This means that for many appointees, these restrictions don’t make the bank account practical or fit for purpose.

If you are an appointee or deputy for a loved one, you can open an FSCS-protected bank account easily on our banking platform in the same way that many solicitors and local authorities do. Just contact us and our banking services team will be happy to help. Open an appointee bank account here.

 

 

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee must inform the DWP if there is any change in a person’s circumstances that may affect their welfare benefits, including changes of address or bank account details.

The amount of benefits an individual can claim can be affected by the amount of savings they have. For example, means-tested benefits will typically be stopped if a benefit recipient has savings of £16,000 or above. Welfare benefit payments for means-tested benefits are reduced when a person’s capital breached £6000, however.

The appointee will check the balance of savings for their client regularly and inform the DWP, by letter, when the total amount of savings reaches the levels that may affect a benefit claim.

An appointee does not have the authority to deal directly with banks or with capital or other income belonging to the incapacitated person. An appointee does, however, have the authority to deal with an incapacitated person’s Post Office account.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

When a person with an appointee passes away, the appointee must notify the Department for Work & Pensions to inform them of the passing at the earliest opportunity. The DWP may require a copy of the official death certificate also.

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Carer Cards - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Carer Cards - FAQ's

Money Carer cards are contactless and can be used in any retail outlet that accepts Mastercard in-store, or online, anywhere in the world.

This means that the cards can be used in the vast majority of retail outlets as nearly all retailers accepting card payments accept payments via Mastercard.

The cards can also be used to withdraw cash from ATM machines importantly, with no fees charged for this, due to Money Carers’ unique banking partnership with Cashplus Bank.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Carer Cards - FAQ's

The person or organisation managing a Money Carer card can set a balance limit on each account to avoid excessive funds accruing.

This means that if you are the appointee, attorney, or deputy of a vulnerable person and our using a Money Carer card to provide their carers with shopping funds, you can control the limits.

So for example, if the money that you manage for a loved one is held in a high street bank such as Barclays, Lloyds, or HSBC, you can set up a standing order to add funds to the Money Carer card account for nominated carers to use. However, if you wanted to set a limit on the amount of money that could be held in the account at any time then you can do that.

You would simply log on to your Money Carer account, set a balance limit, say two hundred pounds for example, and then if the balance on the Money Carer card goes above that our sweep system can automatically transfer the funds over the two hundred limit back to the bank account of your choice automatically.

This helps to provide greater protection for your loved one and demonstrates that you are acting responsibly and shows that you have financial control measures.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Carer Cards - FAQ's

Yes, we can.

In fact, our ability to do this is a very helpful service as it enables us to assist family members who may have the legal responsibility for managing their loved ones’ finances however, they themselves may struggle with online banking or getting to a bank branch to set up a standing order to top up their Money Carer card.

We can take care of this by setting up a variable direct debit instruction via our banking platform. This also enables us to be able to take additional funds, one-off funds for larger purchases from time to time such as buying a new TV or enabling carers to have access to money to organise a holiday for example.

This card funding option is protected by the Direct Debit Guarantee which always means the person or organisation that is managing the finances of a loved one or client is in control.

 

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Power of Attorney - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The costs involved in setting up a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) for property and affairs can vary depending on several factors, including where you live and whether you choose to use a solicitor or complete the process yourself. Here are some of the potential costs you may incur:

  1. LPA application fee: In England and Wales, there is a fee of £82 per application to register an LPA for property and affairs.
  2. Solicitor fees: If you choose to use a solicitor to set up your LPA, you will need to pay their fees. The cost of using a solicitor can vary, but it’s usually several hundred pounds.
  3. Certificate provider fees: You will need to have someone sign your LPA to confirm that you understand what you are doing and that you are not being pressured into it. This person is called a certificate provider, and they may charge a fee for their services.
  4. Copying and postage fees: You may need to pay for photocopying and postage costs to send your LPA application to the Office of the Public Guardian.

It’s worth noting that if you receive certain means-tested benefits, you may be eligible for a reduced or waived application fee.

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Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A corporate appointee is an organisation appointed by the DWP to manage the welfare benefit responsibilities of a claimant. For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For example, corporate appointees are organisations such as The Money Carer Foundation or local authorities.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

No, DWP appointees do not have the legal authority to access a person’s private bank account unless they have been specifically granted that authority by the person or by a court order.

Where the person has consented for their appointee to access their personal bank account, then it must be clear, that the person has the ‘decision specific’ capacity to be able to weigh up and understand this decision.

It may be appropriate to have this decision-specific understanding documented in a separate mental capacity assessment as best practice to avoid any challenges about the persons ability to consent to someone accessing their personal bank account by banks or other organisations.

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
Thumbs Down Icon 0
Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Uniquely, we have our own banking platform with Cashplus Bank and this service is used by hundreds of law firms and local authorities to manage the finances of their own clients.

We are also able to open bank accounts for family members who are appointees, deputies, or have a lasting power of attorney.

The dedicated site for our banking platform is here.

 

View this video on our YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes, but possibly with some difficulty.

The reality is that it can be quite difficult for a DWP appointee to open a bank account with a high-street bank.

This is because an appointee does not have the same level of authority that a court of protection deputy or lasting power of attorney has. Although some banks do offer a very basic bank account for DWP appointees the process of opening an account can be long-winded and quite involved.

Some bank accounts that are available to appointees also have restrictions such as balance limitations as low as £3000 in some cases. This means that for many appointees, these restrictions don’t make the bank account practical or fit for purpose.

If you are an appointee or deputy for a loved one, you can open an FSCS-protected bank account easily on our banking platform in the same way that many solicitors and local authorities do. Just contact us and our banking services team will be happy to help. Open an appointee bank account here.

 

 

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee must inform the DWP if there is any change in a person’s circumstances that may affect their welfare benefits, including changes of address or bank account details.

The amount of benefits an individual can claim can be affected by the amount of savings they have. For example, means-tested benefits will typically be stopped if a benefit recipient has savings of £16,000 or above. Welfare benefit payments for means-tested benefits are reduced when a person’s capital breached £6000, however.

The appointee will check the balance of savings for their client regularly and inform the DWP, by letter, when the total amount of savings reaches the levels that may affect a benefit claim.

An appointee does not have the authority to deal directly with banks or with capital or other income belonging to the incapacitated person. An appointee does, however, have the authority to deal with an incapacitated person’s Post Office account.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

When a person with an appointee passes away, the appointee must notify the Department for Work & Pensions to inform them of the passing at the earliest opportunity. The DWP may require a copy of the official death certificate also.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Carer Cards - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Carer Cards - FAQ's

Money Carer cards are contactless and can be used in any retail outlet that accepts Mastercard in-store, or online, anywhere in the world.

This means that the cards can be used in the vast majority of retail outlets as nearly all retailers accepting card payments accept payments via Mastercard.

The cards can also be used to withdraw cash from ATM machines importantly, with no fees charged for this, due to Money Carers’ unique banking partnership with Cashplus Bank.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Carer Cards - FAQ's

The person or organisation managing a Money Carer card can set a balance limit on each account to avoid excessive funds accruing.

This means that if you are the appointee, attorney, or deputy of a vulnerable person and our using a Money Carer card to provide their carers with shopping funds, you can control the limits.

So for example, if the money that you manage for a loved one is held in a high street bank such as Barclays, Lloyds, or HSBC, you can set up a standing order to add funds to the Money Carer card account for nominated carers to use. However, if you wanted to set a limit on the amount of money that could be held in the account at any time then you can do that.

You would simply log on to your Money Carer account, set a balance limit, say two hundred pounds for example, and then if the balance on the Money Carer card goes above that our sweep system can automatically transfer the funds over the two hundred limit back to the bank account of your choice automatically.

This helps to provide greater protection for your loved one and demonstrates that you are acting responsibly and shows that you have financial control measures.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Carer Cards - FAQ's

Yes, we can.

In fact, our ability to do this is a very helpful service as it enables us to assist family members who may have the legal responsibility for managing their loved ones’ finances however, they themselves may struggle with online banking or getting to a bank branch to set up a standing order to top up their Money Carer card.

We can take care of this by setting up a variable direct debit instruction via our banking platform. This also enables us to be able to take additional funds, one-off funds for larger purchases from time to time such as buying a new TV or enabling carers to have access to money to organise a holiday for example.

This card funding option is protected by the Direct Debit Guarantee which always means the person or organisation that is managing the finances of a loved one or client is in control.

 

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Power of Attorney - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The costs involved in setting up a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) for property and affairs can vary depending on several factors, including where you live and whether you choose to use a solicitor or complete the process yourself. Here are some of the potential costs you may incur:

  1. LPA application fee: In England and Wales, there is a fee of £82 per application to register an LPA for property and affairs.
  2. Solicitor fees: If you choose to use a solicitor to set up your LPA, you will need to pay their fees. The cost of using a solicitor can vary, but it’s usually several hundred pounds.
  3. Certificate provider fees: You will need to have someone sign your LPA to confirm that you understand what you are doing and that you are not being pressured into it. This person is called a certificate provider, and they may charge a fee for their services.
  4. Copying and postage fees: You may need to pay for photocopying and postage costs to send your LPA application to the Office of the Public Guardian.

It’s worth noting that if you receive certain means-tested benefits, you may be eligible for a reduced or waived application fee.

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