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Appointeeship and Deputyship FAQs

Welfare benefits, carer cards and money
management for vulnerable people FAQ’s

Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A DWP appointee is someone who is appointed to manage the welfare benefits and money management matters of a person who is unable to do so themselves.

This could be because the person has a mental or physical disability, or they are unable to manage their affairs for other reasons.

The appointee is responsible for making sure that the person’s welfare benefits are applied for accurately, received in a separate bank account and used for the benefit of the person they are appointed to represent.

They are also responsible for managing the person’s finances, paying bills and making decisions about how the person’s money is spent.

To become a DWP appointee, a person must apply to the Department for Work and Pensions by completing a BF56 application form and then meet with a DWP visiting officer.

Once appointed, the appointee has legal responsibilities and must act in the best interests of the person they represent and understand the 5 underpinning principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Uniquely, we have our own banking platform with Cashplus Bank and this service is used by hundreds of law firms and local authorities to manage the finances of their own clients.

We are also able to open bank accounts for family members who are appointees, deputies, or have a lasting power of attorney.

The dedicated site for our banking platform is here.

 

View this video on our YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee has to be aged 18 plus and can be a family member or trusted friend or a specialist organisation whom the DWP can authorise to become the person’s corporate appointee.

The local council can also act as the appointee, although there can be conflicts of interest when local authorities become appointees. As such, many local authorities are choosing to partner with organisations such as Money Carer. Many local authorities do not have enough resources to provide an appointeeship service, which is another reason they cannot take on the role.

Some care providers also still act as appointees however, again, due to the conflicts of interest, these arrangements are increasingly being discouraged by local authorities and the care services regulator as not reflecting best practice.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

The rationale behind making someone an appointee is that they will have regular contact with the service user and their circle of care. This may become problematic when the appointee lives overseas.

If a client with an existing appointee moves overseas and the appointee who is staying in the UK indicates that they wish to retain the role, the DWP will discuss the position with the appointee.  Unless there is someone near to where the client is moving or an organisation that is able to take on the role, then it is possible for the existing appointee can remain in place.

If the appointee wishes to remain the appointee but moves abroad with the customer remaining in the UK then it may be more suitable to consider involving a new appointee or a Corporate Appointee service such as The Money Carer Foundation to resume responsibility for the required appointeeship.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee must inform the DWP if there is any change in a person’s circumstances that may affect their welfare benefits, including changes of address or bank account details.

The amount of benefits an individual can claim can be affected by the amount of savings they have. For example, means-tested benefits will typically be stopped if a benefit recipient has savings of £16,000 or above. Welfare benefit payments for means-tested benefits are reduced when a person’s capital breached £6000, however.

The appointee will check the balance of savings for their client regularly and inform the DWP, by letter, when the total amount of savings reaches the levels that may affect a benefit claim.

An appointee does not have the authority to deal directly with banks or with capital or other income belonging to the incapacitated person. An appointee does, however, have the authority to deal with an incapacitated person’s Post Office account.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

If the person does not have any friends or relatives to act as an appointee, then The Money Carer Foundation or another suitably experienced organisation can apply to become the DWP appointee.

 

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

When a person with an appointee passes away, the appointee must notify the Department for Work & Pensions to inform them of the passing at the earliest opportunity. The DWP may require a copy of the official death certificate also.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

No. Unlike Lasting Power of Attorney agreements or Court of Protection deputyship orders, there can be only one legal appointee.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Social services can request an appointee as part of the best interest or safeguarding decisions. Social workers regularly request appointeeships when undertaking care plan assessments.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee may resign if they are no longer able to carry out the role by giving one month’s written notice to the DWP

The DWP also has the power to revoke the appointeeship.  If there is evidence of an appointee not acting in the best interests of the claimant, the DWP must be informed and they will investigate such claims.

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Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

A DWP appointee is someone who is appointed to manage the welfare benefits and money management matters of a person who is unable to do so themselves.

This could be because the person has a mental or physical disability, or they are unable to manage their affairs for other reasons.

The appointee is responsible for making sure that the person’s welfare benefits are applied for accurately, received in a separate bank account and used for the benefit of the person they are appointed to represent.

They are also responsible for managing the person’s finances, paying bills and making decisions about how the person’s money is spent.

To become a DWP appointee, a person must apply to the Department for Work and Pensions by completing a BF56 application form and then meet with a DWP visiting officer.

Once appointed, the appointee has legal responsibilities and must act in the best interests of the person they represent and understand the 5 underpinning principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

 

View this video on the Money Carer YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 2
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Uniquely, we have our own banking platform with Cashplus Bank and this service is used by hundreds of law firms and local authorities to manage the finances of their own clients.

We are also able to open bank accounts for family members who are appointees, deputies, or have a lasting power of attorney.

The dedicated site for our banking platform is here.

 

View this video on our YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee has to be aged 18 plus and can be a family member or trusted friend or a specialist organisation whom the DWP can authorise to become the person’s corporate appointee.

The local council can also act as the appointee, although there can be conflicts of interest when local authorities become appointees. As such, many local authorities are choosing to partner with organisations such as Money Carer. Many local authorities do not have enough resources to provide an appointeeship service, which is another reason they cannot take on the role.

Some care providers also still act as appointees however, again, due to the conflicts of interest, these arrangements are increasingly being discouraged by local authorities and the care services regulator as not reflecting best practice.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

 

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

The rationale behind making someone an appointee is that they will have regular contact with the service user and their circle of care. This may become problematic when the appointee lives overseas.

If a client with an existing appointee moves overseas and the appointee who is staying in the UK indicates that they wish to retain the role, the DWP will discuss the position with the appointee.  Unless there is someone near to where the client is moving or an organisation that is able to take on the role, then it is possible for the existing appointee can remain in place.

If the appointee wishes to remain the appointee but moves abroad with the customer remaining in the UK then it may be more suitable to consider involving a new appointee or a Corporate Appointee service such as The Money Carer Foundation to resume responsibility for the required appointeeship.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee must inform the DWP if there is any change in a person’s circumstances that may affect their welfare benefits, including changes of address or bank account details.

The amount of benefits an individual can claim can be affected by the amount of savings they have. For example, means-tested benefits will typically be stopped if a benefit recipient has savings of £16,000 or above. Welfare benefit payments for means-tested benefits are reduced when a person’s capital breached £6000, however.

The appointee will check the balance of savings for their client regularly and inform the DWP, by letter, when the total amount of savings reaches the levels that may affect a benefit claim.

An appointee does not have the authority to deal directly with banks or with capital or other income belonging to the incapacitated person. An appointee does, however, have the authority to deal with an incapacitated person’s Post Office account.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

If the person does not have any friends or relatives to act as an appointee, then The Money Carer Foundation or another suitably experienced organisation can apply to become the DWP appointee.

 

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

When a person with an appointee passes away, the appointee must notify the Department for Work & Pensions to inform them of the passing at the earliest opportunity. The DWP may require a copy of the official death certificate also.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

No. Unlike Lasting Power of Attorney agreements or Court of Protection deputyship orders, there can be only one legal appointee.

For further information about becoming a DWP appointee, please download our appointee guide for family members.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Social services can request an appointee as part of the best interest or safeguarding decisions. Social workers regularly request appointeeships when undertaking care plan assessments.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
Thumbs Up Icon 0
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

An appointee may resign if they are no longer able to carry out the role by giving one month’s written notice to the DWP

The DWP also has the power to revoke the appointeeship.  If there is evidence of an appointee not acting in the best interests of the claimant, the DWP must be informed and they will investigate such claims.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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