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Appointeeship and Deputyship FAQs

Welfare benefits, carer cards and money
management for vulnerable people FAQ’s

Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Uniquely, we have our own banking platform with Cashplus Bank and this service is used by hundreds of law firms and local authorities to manage the finances of their own clients.

We are also able to open bank accounts for family members who are appointees, deputies, or have a lasting power of attorney.

The dedicated site for our banking platform is here.

 

View this video on our YouTube channel

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

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Power of Attorney - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

In the UK, LPA stands for Lasting Power of Attorney, and GPA stands for General Power of Attorney.

The main difference between the two is that an LPA is a legal document that allows an individual (the donor) to appoint one or more people (the attorneys) to make decisions on their behalf in case they lose mental capacity. An LPA can cover decisions about health and welfare, as well as property and financial affairs.

On the other hand, a GPA is a legal document that allows an individual (the donor) to appoint an attorney to make decisions on their behalf for a specific period of time, such as when they are out of the country or physically unable to manage their affairs. An GPA only covers decisions about property and financial affairs.

Another difference is that an LPA must be registered with the Office of the Public Guardian before it can be used, while an GPA does not need to be registered.

 

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The costs involved in setting up a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) for property and affairs can vary depending on several factors, including where you live and whether you choose to use a solicitor or complete the process yourself. Here are some of the potential costs you may incur:

  1. LPA application fee: In England and Wales, there is a fee of £82 per application to register an LPA for property and affairs.
  2. Solicitor fees: If you choose to use a solicitor to set up your LPA, you will need to pay their fees. The cost of using a solicitor can vary, but it’s usually several hundred pounds.
  3. Certificate provider fees: You will need to have someone sign your LPA to confirm that you understand what you are doing and that you are not being pressured into it. This person is called a certificate provider, and they may charge a fee for their services.
  4. Copying and postage fees: You may need to pay for photocopying and postage costs to send your LPA application to the Office of the Public Guardian.

It’s worth noting that if you receive certain means-tested benefits, you may be eligible for a reduced or waived application fee.

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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

According to the OPG Annual Report 2021-2022 from the OPG, there was just over 6 million registered power of attorneys in the UK.

 

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Appointeeship - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's

Yes.

Uniquely, we have our own banking platform with Cashplus Bank and this service is used by hundreds of law firms and local authorities to manage the finances of their own clients.

We are also able to open bank accounts for family members who are appointees, deputies, or have a lasting power of attorney.

The dedicated site for our banking platform is here.

 

View this video on our YouTube channel

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

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Power of Attorney - FAQ's

Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Appointeeship - FAQ's, Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The decision to have an appointee or a general power of attorney depends on the individual’s specific needs and circumstances.

An appointee is someone authorised by the DWP to manage an individual’s welfare benefit responsibilities when they are deemed incapable of managing their own affairs due to a mental or physical disability. If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative, an appointee may not be necessary.

On the other hand, a general power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to appoint someone they trust to manage their affairs on their behalf. This could include managing finances or handling legal matters.

If the individual has the capacity to choose their own representative and wants someone they trust to manage their affairs, an general power of attorney may be more suitable.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

In the UK, LPA stands for Lasting Power of Attorney, and GPA stands for General Power of Attorney.

The main difference between the two is that an LPA is a legal document that allows an individual (the donor) to appoint one or more people (the attorneys) to make decisions on their behalf in case they lose mental capacity. An LPA can cover decisions about health and welfare, as well as property and financial affairs.

On the other hand, a GPA is a legal document that allows an individual (the donor) to appoint an attorney to make decisions on their behalf for a specific period of time, such as when they are out of the country or physically unable to manage their affairs. An GPA only covers decisions about property and financial affairs.

Another difference is that an LPA must be registered with the Office of the Public Guardian before it can be used, while an GPA does not need to be registered.

 

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

The costs involved in setting up a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) for property and affairs can vary depending on several factors, including where you live and whether you choose to use a solicitor or complete the process yourself. Here are some of the potential costs you may incur:

  1. LPA application fee: In England and Wales, there is a fee of £82 per application to register an LPA for property and affairs.
  2. Solicitor fees: If you choose to use a solicitor to set up your LPA, you will need to pay their fees. The cost of using a solicitor can vary, but it’s usually several hundred pounds.
  3. Certificate provider fees: You will need to have someone sign your LPA to confirm that you understand what you are doing and that you are not being pressured into it. This person is called a certificate provider, and they may charge a fee for their services.
  4. Copying and postage fees: You may need to pay for photocopying and postage costs to send your LPA application to the Office of the Public Guardian.

It’s worth noting that if you receive certain means-tested benefits, you may be eligible for a reduced or waived application fee.

Did you find this FAQ helpful?
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Appointeeship, Deputyship, Carer Cards, Power of Attorney Power of Attorney - FAQ's

According to the OPG Annual Report 2021-2022 from the OPG, there was just over 6 million registered power of attorneys in the UK.

 

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